Identification of the glacial signal from the Antarctic Peninsula since 3.0 Ma at Site 1101 in a continental rise sediment drift

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doi: 10.2973/odp.proc.sr.178.206.2001
Author(s): Cowan, Ellen A.
Ocean Drilling Program, Leg 178, Shipboard Scientific Party, College Station, TX
Author Affiliation(s): Primary:
Appalachian State University, Department of Geology, Boone, NC, United States
Other:
Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale, Italy
Ocean Drilling Program, United States
University of Minnesota at Minneapolis, United States
Appalachian State University, United States
University of Melbourne, Australia
Hamilton College, United States
California State University at Hayward, United States
University of Leeds, United Kingdom
University of Toronto at Scarborough, Canada
University of Florida, United States
University of Leicester, United Kingdom
Istituto di Riceaca "Geomare Sud", Italy
Kochi University, Japan
University of California at Los Angeles, United States
Laboratoire de Mesures en Forage, France
Universidad de Granada, Spain
Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Federal Republic of Germany
U. S. Geological Survey, United States
Brown University, United States
Uppsala University, United States
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, United States
Volume Title: Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, scientific results, Antarctic glacial history and sea-level change; covering Leg 178 of the cruises of the drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution; Punta Arenas, Chile, to Cape Town, South Africa; sites 1095-1103; 5 February-9 April 1998
Volume Author(s): Baker, Peter F., editor; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Acton, Gary D.; Brachfeld, Stefanie A.; Cowan, Ellen A.; Daniels, James; Domack, Eugene W.; Escutia, Carlota; Evans, Andrew J.; Eyles, Nicholas; Guyodo, Yohan J. B.; Hatfield, Kate L.; Iorio, Marina; Iwai, Masao; Kyte, Frank T.; Lauer, Christine; Maldonado, Andrés; Moerz, Tobias; Osterman, Lisa E.; Pudsey, Carol J.; Schuffert, Jeffrey D.; Sjunneskog, Charlotte M.; Weinheimer, Amy L.; Williams, Trevor; Winter, Diane M.; Wolf-Welling, Thomas C. W.; Ramsay, Anthony T. S.
Source: Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, scientific results, Antarctic glacial history and sea-level change; covering Leg 178 of the cruises of the drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution; Punta Arenas, Chile, to Cape Town, South Africa; sites 1095-1103; 5 February-9 April 1998, Peter F. Baker, Angelo Camerlenghi, Gary D. Acton, Stefanie A. Brachfeld, Ellen A. Cowan, James Daniels, Eugene W. Domack, Carlota Escutia, Andrew J. Evans, Nicholas Eyles, Yohan J. B. Guyodo, Kate L. Hatfield, Marina Iorio, Masao Iwai, Frank T. Kyte, Christine Lauer, Andrés Maldonado, Tobias Moerz, Lisa E. Osterman, Carol J. Pudsey, Jeffrey D. Schuffert, Charlotte M. Sjunneskog, Amy L. Weinheimer, Trevor Williams, Diane M. Winter, Thomas C. W. Wolf-Welling and Anthony T. S. Ramsay; Ocean Drilling Program, Leg 178, Shipboard Scientific Party, College Station, TX. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results (CD ROM), Vol.178, 22p. Publisher: Texas A&M University, Ocean Drilling Program, College Station, TX, United States. ISSN: 1096-2514
Note: In English. Available only on CD-ROM in PDF format and on the Web in PDF or HTML; includes appendix; access date Feb. 24, 2002. 28 refs.CD-ROM format, ISSN 1096-2514; WWW format, ISSN 1096-7451; illus., incl. strat. col., 1 table, sketch map
Summary: Sediment drifts on the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula received fine-grained sediment and ice-rafted debris (IRD) directly from the continental shelf and thus indirectly record the history of West Antarctic glaciation. Site 1101 contains a 218-m-thick, nearly continuous section extending from the late Pliocene to the Holocene. To assess the presence of calving glaciers at sea level in the Antarctic Peninsula region, the mass accumulation rate (MAR) of IRD was calculated using the weight percent terrigenous sand fraction (250 µm to 2 mm). IRD MAR is cyclic throughout, with small peaks alternating with periods of low or no IRD. Many cycles have a sawtooth pattern that increases gradually to the peak then abruptly decreases to zero. This pattern is consistent with rapid disintegration of ice streams and release of icebergs from the continental shelf. Three unusually large peaks (three to five times the size of other peaks) occurred at approximately 2.8, 1.9, and 0.88 Ma and indicate periods of intense ice rafting. Lithofacies were described in detail using X-radiographs and core descriptions for the interval from 1.34 to 0.54 Ma. Glacial units are represented by thickly laminated mud deposited by distal turbidites and meltwater plumes. Less commonly, thinly laminated sediment formed by contour currents and diamicton by intense ice rafting. Interglacials are represented by foraminifer-bearing mud with IRD. Ice rafting appears to have increased in the later part of the glacial period and remained high in the interglacial period.
Year of Publication: 2002
Research Program: ODP Ocean Drilling Program
Key Words: 12 Stratigraphy, Historical Geology and Paleoecology; Antarctic Ocean; Antarctic Peninsula; Antarctica; Biostratigraphy; Cenozoic; Clastic sediments; Climate change; Continental rise; Cores; Debris; Depositional environment; Drift; Foraminifera; Grain size; Holocene; Ice rafting; Invertebrata; Leg 178; Lithofacies; Marine sediments; Microfossils; Neogene; ODP Site 1101; Ocean Drilling Program; Ocean floors; Paleoclimatology; Pliocene; Protista; Quaternary; Sedimentation; Sedimentation rates; Sediments; Tertiary; Upper Pliocene
Coordinates: S642220 S642220 W0701540 W0701540
Record ID: 2003022405
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