Climatically driven emissions of hydrocarbons from marine sediments during deglaciation

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doi: 10.1073/pnas.0601304103
Author(s): Hill, T. M.; Kennett, J. P.; Valentine, D. L.; Yang, Z.; Reddy, C. M.; Nelson, R. K.; Behl, R. J.; Robert, C.; Beaufort, L.
Author Affiliation(s): Primary:
University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Earth Science, Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Other:
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, United States
California State University, Long Beach, United States
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France
Volume Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(37), p.13570-13574. Publisher: National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, United States. ISSN: 0027-8424 CODEN: PNASA6
Note: In English. Supplemental information/data is available in the online version of this article. 30 refs.; illus., incl. charts, sketch map
Summary: Marine hydrocarbon seepage emits oil and gas, including methane (≈30 Tg of CH4 per year), to the ocean and atmosphere. Sediments from the California margin contain preserved tar, primarily formed through hydrocarbon weathering at the sea surface. We present a record of variation in the abundance of tar in sediments for the past 32,000 years, providing evidence for increases in hydrocarbon emissions before and during Termination IA [16,000 years ago (16 ka) to 14 ka] and again over Termination IB (11-10 ka). Our study provides direct evidence for increased hydrocarbon seepage associated with deglacial warming through tar abundance in marine sediments, independent of previous geochemical proxies. Climate-sensitive gas hydrates may modulate thermogenic hydrocarbon seepage during deglaciation.
Year of Publication: 2006
Research Program: ODP Ocean Drilling Program
Key Words: 24 Surficial Geology, Quaternary Geology; Aliphatic hydrocarbons; Alkanes; Aromatic hydrocarbons; C-13/C-12; Carbon; Cenozoic; Climate change; Continental margin; Deglaciation; East Pacific; Gas hydrates; Gas seeps; Holocene; Hopanes; Hopanoids; Hydrates; Hydrocarbons; Isotope ratios; Isotopes; Leg 146; Leg 167; MIS 3; Marine sediments; Methane; Monterey Formation; North Pacific; Northeast Pacific; O-18/O-16; ODP Site 1016; ODP Site 893; Ocean Drilling Program; Organic compounds; Oxygen; Pacific Ocean; Petroleum; Petroleum exploration; Pleistocene; Quaternary; Santa Barbara Basin; Sea-level changes; Sediment traps; Sediments; Seepage; Stability; Stable isotopes; Tar; Triterpanes; Upper Pleistocene
Coordinates: N340500 N343000 W1194000 W1203000
Record ID: 2010021253
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